Death keeps no calendar and it is a wise man or woman who is prepared. Only 10% of people die unexpectedly. So for the remaining 90% there is forewarning of the likelihood of nearing death.

Many of the practical outcomes affect people other than yourself such as family and carer. For example, a dependant left with no will may find it difficult to organise his or her finances for day to day expenses or families may be left at odds when considering how to share what you leave. Your doctor and carers may be lost knowing how best to treat you without knowing what you would have wanted. It is a gift that you leave to them all if you are prepared.

It is so important that you leave your instructions written down, having shared them where ever possible with your family carers and medical staff. Having written them down it is just as important for people to know where those instructions are kept so that they are available when needed.

You may wish to donate your organs to help other people. There is a dire shortage of most organs for transplantation. Donating an organ may be a life giving gift to somebody else. Your family need to know and agree when they are asked after your death. So often it is the first they have heard about it and, in the moments of grief, often refuse. It is really important that you talk to them so they know your wishes – another reason for a conversation.

Here are the practical things needed to be done. None of them are difficult but some advice is given here and links given as to how you can get professional advice.

The sub pages of this section provide a list of the practical things needed to be done. None of them are difficult but some advice is given here and links given as to how you can get professional advice.